While cheerleading for sports is not limited to basketball and football, those are the main sports that people associate with pee wee, Little League, middle school and high school cheerleading.

It's important for these sideline cheerleaders to understand the lingo of both games so they can call out cheers and so they don't look lost during the cheerleading performances at games.

Some of the common terms that you will hear when you cheer at football and basketball games may sound the same, but will apply to each game in a unique way.

Here's a quick reference for some of the common lingo associated with football and basketball:

Basketball

Court: A basketball game takes place on a court, which is split in half between two teams. An indoor basketball court is usually a dark tan/light brown, with the boundary lines draw in blue, red, black and/or white.

Basket: There is an elevated hoop with a net located at each end of the court, called a basket. When a team puts the ball in their opponent's basket, that team scores.

Backboard: The backboard is what the basket is attached to. It is a rectangle shape, sized at 6' x 3 1/2'. The backboard is often used to help a player make a shot.

Defense: When the other team has the ball and your team is trying to block them, it is called defense. Think of it as the time in the game when your team has to defend their side of the court.

Offense: When your team has the ball and is trying to score against the opposing team, your team is on offense.

Forwards: A team will have small, power and center forward positions on the court. The small are usually the highest scorers.

Guards: There are 2 guards on the court during play. The guards are usually the smallest players on the team, and they are responsible for supporting plays by helping to set the team up and passing the ball to players that will take a shot.

Blocking: This is when one player stays with a player from the opposing team to prevent them from getting the ball or scoring a basket.

Dribble: This is when a player using the palm of their hand to bounce the ball off the ground repeatedly. A player must dribble when they are moving; being in motion while holding the ball is called traveling and is not a legal play.

Pass: When one player tosses the ball to a teammate.

Foul: A foul happens when a player breaks a rule, and can result in a penalty.

Rebound: If a shot misses the basket and the ball is retrieved by a player before bouncing on the ground, it is called a rebound.

Football

Field A football game takes place on an outdoor, grassy field, which is sized at 100 yards long and 160 feet wide. There are white lines and numbers on the field that mark boundaries and plays.

End zone: The end zone is a 10 yard long section at the end of each side of the field. One way for a team to score is for a player to enter the opposing team's end zone with the ball.

Huddle: When the active team members come together in a circle to discuss the strategy of the next play.

Defense: When the other team has the ball and your team is trying to block them, it is called defense. Think of it as the time in the game when your team has to defend their side of the field.

Offense: When your team has the ball and is trying to score against the opposing team, your team is on offense.

Quarterback: The quarterback is the offensive leader of a team, and also has the responsibility of maintaining strategy and play communication among the team during the game.

Kickoff: The kick off puts the ball into play during the 1st and 3rd quarters, as well as after every touchdown and field goal.

Snap: A snap is one way to set up a kick off. The center hikes the ball and when the holder has it in position, the punter kicks it.

Down: An action of the game that starts when the ball is in play and ends when the play is over. The offense must advance the ball 10 yards in four downs, or it will become their opponent's play.

Tackle: A tackle is when the player in possession of the ball is stopped (often taken to the ground) by a member "“ or several members - of the opposing team.

Foul: A foul happens when a player breaks a rule, and can result in a penalty.

Fumble: A fumble occurs when the ball is dropped by or knocked out of the hands of a player before the play ends.

Incompletion: When the ball is passed among teammates but falls to the ground or is caught out of bounds, it is an incompletion.

Interception: When the ball is passed among teammates but is caught by a player on the opposing team, it is called an interception. An interception results in loss of control of the ball.