Congratulations, you are the team captain! You have worked hard as a team leader, and finally, you got the title. Now, where is your dang crown?!

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Being a good leader and team captain can be a struggle, though. It is a great honor, but sometimes, it may feel like it is not worth it. Bet you didn’t realize you were going to be a mother, a friend, a therapist, a party planner, and a social coordinator, did you? These are some of the responsibilities you may have to face as a team captain, and it can be hard to find your rhythm during your first year. But, after a while, you will find your balance.

That ONE teammate.

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Every team has that one person who just gets on your every last nerve. Well, as a captain, you have to treat everyone equally. You cannot have favorites. So, that person who’s very presence makes you cringe deserves to be treated with as much respect, as much attention, and as much care as ever other person on the team. A good way to get past this is to not focus on that person’s personality, but to focus on what they bring to the team. This can help to overshadow the urge to scream at the top of your lungs when you see them. You might never be friends, but seeing them as a valued member of the team will help you, as a leader, set those biases aside. After the season is over and after graduation, you may be saying to yourself, “bye Felicia”… but until that day comes, you are a leader and you need to set the standard for the rest of the team.

Friends not taking you seriously.


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You’re a captain now, and your friends may think they can slip up or misbehave. It is hard to have that conversation with your friends, but honestly, they are the ones being cruddy friends if they’re acting this way. You worked hard for your position, and they are the ones taking advantage. You have to set ground rules for your friends so that your other teammates won’t think that you are playing favorites. You all are friends for a reason, and they will understand the bigger picture if you talk to them. Some friends may not understand in the beginning, and some may think that you are even being power-hungry, but in the end, they will be grateful that you stood strong as a fair leader–one that deserves respect!

Parents still see you as a child.


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Sometimes, parents do not want to talk to you. They would much rather talk to the coach, because they still see you as a kid. You are not a kid: you are a young adult, and you deserve to be treated as such. However, parents do not often understand that based on your age. This can be frustrating when tackling issues with parents, or working on fundraising efforts. You became a captain because you are mature enough to hold that title down, and if you show that maturity when talking to parents, they will come around about 90% of the time. That other 10% will not care, and will treat you like you are a five-year-old; the only thing you can do at that point is keep your cool, and act like the young adult that you are.

All fingers point to you.


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You, as the captain, will take the blame for your team. If your team acts out, they will get into trouble and so will you. The best way to keep your team in line is to remember that the team looks ups to you, so you need to lead by example. You need to always put your best foot forward. An easy way to overcome this is to always act like your coach is watching. If your team sees you acting out, they will act out too, so remember that eyes are always on you… and so are ears.

But, at the end of the day...  


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Being a captain isn’t always easy, but it is very rewarding. The skills you learn as a captain are transferable to real life skills, too! The role shows that you are a great leader, you know how to work with people, and you can inspire people. You may not get an ACTUAL crown, but you sure will feel like a queen bee!

What are other problems that all cheer captains face? Share your stories with us in the comments!